Rules That Apply To Trendy Electric Scooters In Europe

More and more tourists are renting e-scooters. Whether Vienna, Barcelona, ​​Rome or Paris – the regulations are different everywhere in Europe. Prior to purchasing from escootersdirect electric scooters Ireland, educate yourself on the regulations that apply to your country.

Electric Scooters Legal in the UK

They are part of the street scene of every European metropolis: e-scooters, mostly as sharing rental scooters. It is an environmentally friendly addition to the previously known means of transport. However, there are many problems in everyday life: often ruthless and traffic-violent behavior, untidy parking and sometimes serious accidents with pedestrians. In Madrid, an elderly woman died after colliding with an e-scooter.

“The problems are similar everywhere,” says ADAC lawyer Peter Jaklin, “only the solutions in Europe are very different.” And some of them differ significantly from the e-scooter rules in Germany.

E-scooters are not allowed in the Netherlands

E-scooters are allowed almost all over Europe. But there are exceptions, for example, the Netherlands. “They are seen here in a similar way to mopeds,” explains Jaklin. “They would, therefore, need a driver’s seat and for this reason have not been permitted until now.” Europe is largely in agreement with the alcohol limit of 0.5. Austria allows for 0.8.

There is only compulsory insurance like in Germany in a few countries, for example in France. So far, the requirement to wear a helmet is only known for Portugal. In most countries, the scooters are generally allowed to ride on bike paths, only in exceptional cases on sidewalks and in pedestrian zones.

If you take your own e-scooter with you when traveling, you should inquire beforehand what is allowed abroad. For example, scooters with a German license plate are not permitted in France.

E-scooters: This applies in Germany and in Europe

In Germany, e-scooters are allowed on bike paths and bicycle roads. Only if these are missing can they switch to the road. E-scooters are prohibited on sidewalks and in pedestrian zones unless there is a “E-scooter free” sign. Youngsters from the age of 14 are allowed to drive the scooter – the driver does not need a moped test certificate or a driver’s license.

E-scooters may only be used on their own, and children may not be taken with them. A helmet is recommended but is not a requirement. Liability insurance, however, is mandatory. The corresponding small license plate costs about 30 euros per year. For alcohol, the limits apply as for drivers: 0.5 per mille, for signs of failure from 0.3 per mille and 0.0 for novice drivers. You can read what applies in other European countries in the table. Just click through.